NOW : Walden in Schloss Hollenegg 
CONTACT
pag 3
LAWS OF EXPENDABILITY / 2011
pag 5
STATE OF TRANSIENCE / 2012
pag 9
CHARACTER OF HUMAN ACTIVITY / 2012
pag 13
DASHILAR FLAGSHIP STORE / 2013
pag 16
UTOPIA BARCELONA / 2015
pag 21
TELEVISION TABLES / 2015
pag 23
THIS WAS A COUNTERFEIT / 2016
pag 25
CONTRABANDE / 2016
pag 27
THE EXOTIC SUITE / 2017
pag 32
MONDRIAN FOR SALE / 2017
pag 34
特斯韦克 2018
pag 36
OUT OF THE ORDINARY / 2018
pag 39
THANK YOU FOR THE SUN / 2018
pag 42
PLEASE TAKE OF YOUR SHOES / 2019
pag 45
pag 48
LAWS OF EXPANDABILITY / 2011 
Beijing is a city undergoing extreme transformation. Mega-Blocks are rising everywhere, quickly replacing the old hut ones. These new high-rises bring an improvement to the living standards for the Chinese population, with more space and better facilities; but there is a downside to this kind of development - a lack of individual expression in the new buildings. These mega-blocks are developed from the top down; because everything is taken care of, people no longer feel personally involved with their environment. This phenomenon also occurs in the Netherlands, but far more gradually. In many urban areas, city planners decide how people should live in the coming decades. They rarely accommodate people’s need for change. The potential for chang should be incorporated into the planning process. Looking at the rigidity of long-term planning strategies in both China and the Netherlands, I began to wonder how our world would look if we built to satisfy our present needs, rather then trying to predict our needs for the rest of our lives. Could a city be built from individuality while still embracing the collective?  

Scroll to read more >>>

I created several personal spaces , equal in size. These volumes have the ability to expand and shrink according to human needs and interests. The idea is that all human beings are more or less the same, but as we live our lives, we develop interests and ideologies that shape our existence. When these spaces expand, blurring the boundaries between architecture and furniture, they also explore the border between the public and the private in an experimental way. Instead of a hard wall separating the inside from the outside, this separation can be conceived as an interaction of volumes and functions, a progression of shapes that characterize human activities. These ‘designs’ of self-perpetuating spaces follow their own logic; they could never have been made on a drawing board. 

Text by Gabrielle Kennedy / published in NEXT / photo’s by Sander Wassink 
STATE OF TRANSIENCE / 2012 
The on-going project, State of Transience, is a responsive design process, which is continuously shifting over time. Using the relatively simple design archetype of a chair, Sander Wassink repurposes materials, making additions, subtractions and mutations, to suggest the impossibility of a final or fixed form. As the world of design is more and more spreading through images on the internet or the press no physical object is presented. Each new version of this chair, documented in incremental stages, shows evidence of its future potential. Every new state is a testament of the ingenuity of human production and the fragility of supposedly rigid constructions. In this way the project maintains a lineage of its arrangements, preserving both its past iterations and suggesting future possible developments simultaneously. The goal is not a finished product, but instead a material history of combinations and constructions.

Text by Robin Atkinson Photos by Ronald Smits 
CHARACTER OF HUMAN ACTIVITY / 2012
His project Character of Human Activity took as it’s inspiration the construction of collective spaces, areas created for communal activity and collaborative interaction. The fundamental design strategy is to adapt to the needs and ideologies of individuals as they interact in space, a progression shapes built by human activity, which could not be predetermined on a drawing board but must necessarily be adaptive to their inhabitants. In this way, these forms are a testament to the complexity of human interaction, both with one another and with spaces and objects, and in this way, reflect the intricacy daily relations with both the social and built environment. 

---
Text by Robin Atkinson  --- Photos by Sander Wassink 
DASHILAR FLAGSHIP STORE / 2013
During Beijing Design Week 2013, Sander Wassink set up a temporary flagship store in the Chinese capital’s Dashilar district. The fictive flagship store saw him transform the space into a pop-up shoe shop. On this occasion, he used cheap, counterfeit footwear as his choice material, employing designers to cut and re-edit them into new pieces, assembled by local Dashilar shoemakers. Uncracking a new local pride and identity, Wassink’s initiative resulted in an interactive project which led to a refreshed collaboration between the product, the maker and the industry.

Text by designboom / Photo by JW Kaldenbach en Sander Wassink / Project for SALON/BJ 
UTOPIA BARCELONA WITH GUILLERMO SANTOMA / 2015 
TELEVISION TABLES / 2015
THIS WAS A COUNTERFEIT / 2016
CONTRABANDE / 2016
From its inception, the Bauhaus and its timeless geometric aesthetic carried a hegemonic undercurrent. Its luminaries were among the first to realize that designs suitable for mass production could restore uniformity and authenticity to what they viewed as a fragmented and derivative society. Inspired by the movement, Dutch designer W.H. Gispen conceived the Diagonal chair in 1927. Although the frame consisted of a continuous length of tubular steel, one model of the chair had a rustic rattan seat that apparently rejected the Bauhaus principle of alienation from human handicraft.

Scroll to read more >>
Since that era, the trajectory of globalism makes the Bauhaus creed seem ever more prophetic, despite the individual creative impetus and originality so highly regarded in Western societies, as well as the far less egoistic values of the cultures it colonized. In Morocco, for instance, a design is never viewed as a finished product, allowing users the freedom to interpret and adapt the product as they see fit. Dutch designer Sander Wassink initiates a dialogue between indigenous Moroccan aesthetics and global industrialism in his reconstruction of the Diagonal chair. He spent nine days in Sefrou, a small city in Morocco, working with local artisans who had been asked to modify the chair using materials found on the street. Photographs of the chair’s incarnations demonstrate the fluidity of Moroccan design while separating the resultant pieces from the chair itself.

Text by FRAME Magazine / Photos by Sander Wassink 
 
THE EXOTIC SUITE / 2016
MONDRIAN FOR SALE / 2017 
特斯韦克 / 2018
OUT OF THE ORDINARY / 2018 
THANK YOU FOR THE SUN / 2018
PLEASE TAKE OFF YOUR SHOES / 2019 
Sander Wassink, Whose installation Please Take of Your Shoes was presented in his spacious studio during Dutch Design Week 2019, discovered drawing as a liberating force. After experiencing some difficulties during project, he turned to drawing to give him freedom that would satisfy him, and would also take off any pressure that he was feeling, bogged down by the practicalities of design project. The work he showed consisted of some existing and new work brought life by this newfound liberation. He has also started implementing this methodology in his interior design projects. A cornerstone of the exhibition was a large scale carpet created form the  leftover pieces sourced from Dutch company Desso / Tarkett. He wanted to slow people down and take a moment to have a conversation or just willing to embark on a new experience. This choice coincides with Wassink’s way of working with found materials, waste or leftover products, and by combining these, creating something new. 

Text by Damn Magazine / Photos by Sander Wassink 
Sander Wassink is a Dutch artist who encourages us to reconsider our ideas on beauty, aesthetic value and status. How can we reconsider what is important and what is desirable to include notions of history, memory and the preservation of a past which is slipping away. Amid new construction, new production, and constant proliferation of new forms and facades, Wassink turns his attention to the discarded, the abandoned, the left over and attempts to reimagine what can be done with the already partially formed. What new possibilities exist in the surfaces and materials that are half-built or half-destroyed. Whether his object is the partly demolished facade of an abandoned building, or the everyday detritus from our overproductive culture, Wassink asks what new forms and new visions of beauty already exist to be discovered and appreciated. His creative practice sees him heavily engaging in product deconstruction, harnessing the raw material to develop objects with new meaning.  

Scroll to read more >>
His practice evolves organically, opposing the rigid construction of modern architecture, city planning and design. His work tends more towards the shifting, the ephemeral and the momentary. His process tries to take into account how our interactions in space and with objects have specific needs in specific moments. His design projects attempt to reflect the mutating shape of use, value and inhabitation, as it is evidence of human activity. These shifting constructions, which Wassink refers to as self-perpetuating spaces take their inspiration from organically developed communities and forms, appearing more rhizomatic in nature than firmly designed and are often considered to be disorganized or chaotic. These more reactively developed forms are meant to reflect the blurred boundaries between architecture and object, inside and outside, public and private.

Text by Robin Atkinson  
[b]NOW : [/b][i]Walden in [url=https://my.matterport.com/show/?m=vnULC7TtizH&back=1]Schloss Hollenegg [/url][/i][email]Sander@sanderwassink.nl[/email] <br><br>[url=https://www.instagram.com/sander__wassink/?hl=nl]INSTAGRAM[/url] [b]LAWS OF EXPANDABILITY[/b] / [i]2011[/i] Sanderwassink [b]Beijing is a city undergoing extreme transformation. Mega-Blocks are rising everywhere, quickly replacing the old hut ones. These new high-rises bring an improvement to the living standards for the Chinese population, with more space and better facilities; but there is a downside to this kind of development - a lack of individual expression in the new buildings. These mega-blocks are developed from the top down; because everything is taken care of, people no longer feel personally involved with their environment. This phenomenon also occurs in the Netherlands, but far more gradually. In many urban areas, city planners decide how people should live in the coming decades. They rarely accommodate people’s need for change. The potential for chang should be incorporated into the planning process. Looking at the rigidity of long-term planning strategies in both China and the Netherlands, I began to wonder how our world would look if we built to satisfy our present needs, rather then trying to predict our needs for the rest of our lives. Could a city be built from individuality while still embracing the collective?  [/b]<br><br>[i]Scroll to read more >>>[/i]<br>[b]I created several personal spaces , equal in size. These volumes have the ability to expand and shrink according to human needs and interests. The idea is that all human beings are more or less the same, but as we live our lives, we develop interests and ideologies that shape our existence. When these spaces expand, blurring the boundaries between architecture and furniture, they also explore the border between the public and the private in an experimental way. Instead of a hard wall separating the inside from the outside, this separation can be conceived as an interaction of volumes and functions, a progression of shapes that characterize human activities. These ‘designs’ of self-perpetuating spaces follow their own logic; they could never have been made on a drawing board. [/b]<br><br>[i]Text by Gabrielle Kennedy / published in NEXT / photo’s by Sander Wassink [/i]<br>[b]STATE OF TRANSIENCE[/b] / [i]2012[/i] state of transience by sander wassink[b]The on-going project, State of Transience, is a responsive design process, which is continuously shifting over time. Using the relatively simple design archetype of a chair, Sander Wassink repurposes materials, making additions, subtractions and mutations, to suggest the impossibility of a final or fixed form. As the world of design is more and more spreading through images on the internet or the press no physical object is presented. Each new version of this chair, documented in incremental stages, shows evidence of its future potential. Every new state is a testament of the ingenuity of human production and the fragility of supposedly rigid constructions. In this way the project maintains a lineage of its arrangements, preserving both its past iterations and suggesting future possible developments simultaneously. The goal is not a finished product, but instead a material history of combinations and constructions.[/b]<br><br>[i]Text by Robin Atkinson[b] / [/b] [url=http://Www.ronaldsmits.nl]Photos by Ronald Smits [/url][/i]state of transience by sander wassink[b]CHARACTER OF HUMAN ACTIVITY[/b] / [i]2012[/i]his project Character of Human Activity took as it’s inspiration the construction of collective spaces, areas created for communal activity and collaborative interaction. The fundamental design strategy is to adapt to the needs and ideologies of individuals as they interact in space, a progression shapes built by human activity, which could not be predetermined on a drawing board but must necessarily be adaptive to their inhabitants. In this way, these forms are a testament to the complexity of human interaction, both with one another and with spaces and objects, and in this way, reflect the intricacy daily relations with both the social and built environment. <br>[b]--- [/b]Text [i]by Robin Atkinson[/i][b]  --- [/b][i]Photos by Sander Wassink [/i][b]His project Character of Human Activity took as it’s inspiration the construction of collective spaces, areas created for communal activity and collaborative interaction. The fundamental design strategy is to adapt to the needs and ideologies of individuals as they interact in space, a progression shapes built by human activity, which could not be predetermined on a drawing board but must necessarily be adaptive to their inhabitants. In this way, these forms are a testament to the complexity of human interaction, both with one another and with spaces and objects, and in this way, reflect the intricacy daily relations with both the social and built environment. [/b]<br>[b]<br>--- [/b]Text [i]by Robin Atkinson[/i][b]  --- [/b][i]Photos by Sander Wassink [/i][b]DASHILAR FLAGSHIP STORE[/b] / [i]2013[/i]dashilar flagship store by sander wassink[b]During Beijing Design Week 2013, Sander Wassink set up a temporary flagship store in the Chinese capital’s Dashilar district. The fictive flagship store saw him transform the space into a pop-up shoe shop. On this occasion, he used cheap, counterfeit footwear as his choice material, employing designers to cut and re-edit them into new pieces, assembled by local Dashilar shoemakers. Uncracking a new local pride and identity, Wassink’s initiative resulted in an interactive project which led to a refreshed collaboration between the product, the maker and the industry.[/b]<br><br>[i][url=https://www.designboom.com/design/sander-wassink-cuts-and-re-edits-shoes-into-new-footwear/]Text by designboom[/url] / Photo by JW Kaldenbach en Sander Wassink / [url=https://stimuleringsfonds.nl/en/grants_issued/1847/beijing_design_week_2013_salon_bj]Project for SALON/BJ [/url][/i]dashilar flagship store by sander wassinkdashilar flagship store by sander wassink[b]UTOPIA BARCELONA WITH GUILLERMO SANTOMA[/b] / [i]2015[/i] [b]TELEVISION TABLES[/b] / [i]2015[/i]Television table by sander wassink[b]THIS WAS A COUNTERFEIT[/b] / [i]2016[/i]Sander wassink [b]CONTRABANDE[/b] / [i]2016[/i]contraband for boijmans van beuningen by sander wassink[b]From its inception, the Bauhaus and its timeless geometric aesthetic carried a hegemonic undercurrent. Its luminaries were among the first to realize that designs suitable for mass production could restore uniformity and authenticity to what they viewed as a fragmented and derivative society. Inspired by the movement, Dutch designer W.H. Gispen conceived the Diagonal chair in 1927. Although the frame consisted of a continuous length of tubular steel, one model of the chair had a rustic rattan seat that apparently rejected the Bauhaus principle of alienation from human handicraft.[/b]<br><br>[i]Scroll to read more >>[/i][b]Since that era, the trajectory of globalism makes the Bauhaus creed seem ever more prophetic, despite the individual creative impetus and originality so highly regarded in Western societies, as well as the far less egoistic values of the cultures it colonized. In Morocco, for instance, a design is never viewed as a finished product, allowing users the freedom to interpret and adapt the product as they see fit. Dutch designer Sander Wassink initiates a dialogue between indigenous Moroccan aesthetics and global industrialism in his reconstruction of the Diagonal chair. He spent nine days in Sefrou, a small city in Morocco, working with local artisans who had been asked to modify the chair using materials found on the street. Photographs of the chair’s incarnations demonstrate the fluidity of Moroccan design while separating the resultant pieces from the chair itself.[/b]<br><br>[i]Text by FRAME Magazine / Photos by Sander Wassink [/i]<br> contrabande by sander wassink[b]THE EXOTIC SUITE[/b] / [i]2016[/i]sander wassink[b]MONDRIAN FOR SALE [/b]/ [i]2017[/i] mondrian for sale sander wassink[b]特斯韦克[/b] / [i]2018[/i]By sander wassink[b]OUT OF THE ORDINARY[/b] / [i]2018[/i] [b]THANK YOU FOR THE SUN[/b] / [i]2018[/i]thank you for the sun by sander wassink Thank you for the sun by sander wassink[b]PLEASE TAKE OFF YOUR SHOES [/b]/ [i]2019[/i] Please take off your shoes sander wassink[b]Sander Wassink, Whose installation Please Take of Your Shoes was presented in his spacious studio during Dutch Design Week 2019, discovered drawing as a liberating force. After experiencing some difficulties during project, he turned to drawing to give him freedom that would satisfy him, and would also take off any pressure that he was feeling, bogged down by the practicalities of design project. The work he showed consisted of some existing and new work brought life by this newfound liberation. He has also started implementing this methodology in his interior design projects. A cornerstone of the exhibition was a large scale carpet created form the  leftover pieces sourced from Dutch company Desso / Tarkett. He wanted to slow people down and take a moment to have a conversation or just willing to embark on a new experience. This choice coincides with Wassink’s way of working with found materials, waste or leftover products, and by combining these, creating something new. [/b]<br><br>[i]Text by Damn Magazine / Photos by Sander Wassink [/i][b]Sander Wassink is a Dutch artist who encourages us to reconsider our ideas on beauty, aesthetic value and status. How can we reconsider what is important and what is desirable to include notions of history, memory and the preservation of a past which is slipping away. Amid new construction, new production, and constant proliferation of new forms and facades, Wassink turns his attention to the discarded, the abandoned, the left over and attempts to reimagine what can be done with the already partially formed. What new possibilities exist in the surfaces and materials that are half-built or half-destroyed. Whether his object is the partly demolished facade of an abandoned building, or the everyday detritus from our overproductive culture, Wassink asks what new forms and new visions of beauty already exist to be discovered and appreciated. His creative practice sees him heavily engaging in product deconstruction, harnessing the raw material to develop objects with new meaning.  [/b]<br><br>[i]Scroll to read more >>[/i][b]His practice evolves organically, opposing the rigid construction of modern architecture, city planning and design. His work tends more towards the shifting, the ephemeral and the momentary. His process tries to take into account how our interactions in space and with objects have specific needs in specific moments. His design projects attempt to reflect the mutating shape of use, value and inhabitation, as it is evidence of human activity. These shifting constructions, which Wassink refers to as self-perpetuating spaces take their inspiration from organically developed communities and forms, appearing more rhizomatic in nature than firmly designed and are often considered to be disorganized or chaotic. These more reactively developed forms are meant to reflect the blurred boundaries between architecture and object, inside and outside, public and private.[/b]<br><br>[i]Text by Robin Atkinson[/i][b] [/b] 
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